Broadening, strengthening, and deepening our understanding of Vermont; assuring a repository for our collective cultural memory; and strengthening communities by building connections among the diverse peoples of Vermont.

REGISTER TODAY FOR OUR DISCOVERING COMMUNITY SUMMER INSTITUTE

Save the date - June 25-29th - for the Vermont Folklife Center’s week-long summer institute for educators, Discovering Community: Students, Digital Media, and Place-Based Learning, which will be held in Middlebury, Vermont.

The Discovering Community Summer Institute offers participants basic hands-on experience learning the methods of community-based research, the process of making a documentary, and the skills of working with digital media - in a school setting.

Past participants have come from a broad spectrum of roles in the K-12 system, including classroom teachers, special educators, librarians, and administrators. This diversity makes group process a rich opportunity to explore ideas, probe models, and collaboratively visualize site-appropriate applications.

To learn more and for registration:www.discoveringcommunity.org

Ned Castle is joining the Vermont Folklife Center staff this fall as Digital Media Instructor for the Center’s Discovering CommunitySchool Outreach Program to K-12 schools. Ned is an extraordinary documentary photographer whose first major exhibit, “In Their Own Words: Stories from Refugees Settled in Vermont Communities,” (http://their-own-words.org/) was produced in partnership with the Vermont Folklife Center’s Vision & Voice Documentary Workspace. Subsequent exhibit projects—“Indigenous Expressions” at the ECHO Museum and Science Center and the HIGHLOW Project (http://www.highlowproject.org/) that is currently touring statewide—have met with great critical acclaim.
Ned Castle’s approach to photography mirrors the Vermont Folklife Center’s research process in the sense that both strive to understand—and portray—another person’s story from their perspective and on their terms. As Castle observes, “I am a storyteller and photography is my voice. While the quality of my photography is based in part on technique and aesthetic sensibility, I believe that my relationships with people and their worlds is what gives me an effective hand at creating images.” (http://nedcastle.com/)
The Center’s Discovering Community Program (http://www.discoveringcommunity.org/) which Ned is joining, equips students to discover the distinctive character of their hometowns by engaging the stories of family, friends, and community members. The Program draws on concepts from ethnographic research to develop students’ capacity for deep listening and offers templates for using digital media to tell people’s stories collaboratively and responsibly.
Ned will work in tandem with veteran Vermont Folklife Center Education Director, Gregory Sharrow, to introduce students to the interview process and provide technical instruction in photography, audio recording, and digital production. Greg and Ned are available as a team to assist educators with project planning, execution, and evaluation and to mentor students as they present their research through such digital products as virtual exhibitions and audio slide shows.
Ned Castle is joining the Vermont Folklife Center staff this fall as Digital Media Instructor for the Center’s Discovering CommunitySchool Outreach Program to K-12 schools. Ned is an extraordinary documentary photographer whose first major exhibit, “In Their Own Words: Stories from Refugees Settled in Vermont Communities,” (http://their-own-words.org/) was produced in partnership with the Vermont Folklife Center’s Vision & Voice Documentary Workspace. Subsequent exhibit projects—“Indigenous Expressions” at the ECHO Museum and Science Center and the HIGHLOW Project (http://www.highlowproject.org/) that is currently touring statewide—have met with great critical acclaim.
Ned Castle’s approach to photography mirrors the Vermont Folklife Center’s research process in the sense that both strive to understand—and portray—another person’s story from their perspective and on their terms. As Castle observes, “I am a storyteller and photography is my voice. While the quality of my photography is based in part on technique and aesthetic sensibility, I believe that my relationships with people and their worlds is what gives me an effective hand at creating images.” (http://nedcastle.com/)
The Center’s Discovering Community Program (http://www.discoveringcommunity.org/) which Ned is joining, equips students to discover the distinctive character of their hometowns by engaging the stories of family, friends, and community members. The Program draws on concepts from ethnographic research to develop students’ capacity for deep listening and offers templates for using digital media to tell people’s stories collaboratively and responsibly.
Ned will work in tandem with veteran Vermont Folklife Center Education Director, Gregory Sharrow, to introduce students to the interview process and provide technical instruction in photography, audio recording, and digital production. Greg and Ned are available as a team to assist educators with project planning, execution, and evaluation and to mentor students as they present their research through such digital products as virtual exhibitions and audio slide shows.

Ned Castle is joining the Vermont Folklife Center staff this fall as Digital Media Instructor for the Center’s Discovering CommunitySchool Outreach Program to K-12 schools. Ned is an extraordinary documentary photographer whose first major exhibit, “In Their Own Words: Stories from Refugees Settled in Vermont Communities,” (http://their-own-words.org/) was produced in partnership with the Vermont Folklife Center’s Vision & Voice Documentary Workspace. Subsequent exhibit projects—“Indigenous Expressions” at the ECHO Museum and Science Center and the HIGHLOW Project (http://www.highlowproject.org/) that is currently touring statewide—have met with great critical acclaim.

Ned Castle’s approach to photography mirrors the Vermont Folklife Center’s research process in the sense that both strive to understand—and portray—another person’s story from their perspective and on their terms. As Castle observes, “I am a storyteller and photography is my voice. While the quality of my photography is based in part on technique and aesthetic sensibility, I believe that my relationships with people and their worlds is what gives me an effective hand at creating images.” (http://nedcastle.com/)

The Center’s Discovering Community Program (http://www.discoveringcommunity.org/) which Ned is joining, equips students to discover the distinctive character of their hometowns by engaging the stories of family, friends, and community members. The Program draws on concepts from ethnographic research to develop students’ capacity for deep listening and offers templates for using digital media to tell people’s stories collaboratively and responsibly.

Ned will work in tandem with veteran Vermont Folklife Center Education Director, Gregory Sharrow, to introduce students to the interview process and provide technical instruction in photography, audio recording, and digital production. Greg and Ned are available as a team to assist educators with project planning, execution, and evaluation and to mentor students as they present their research through such digital products as virtual exhibitions and audio slide shows.

Larry Therion has been logging the Vermont woods for more than 57 years. You can listen to his fascinating story by clicking on his photo. (Just be sure to scroll to the bottom of the page it takes you to.)
Larry Therion has been logging the Vermont woods for more than 57 years. You can listen to his fascinating story by clicking on his photo. (Just be sure to scroll to the bottom of the page it takes you to.)

Larry Therion has been logging the Vermont woods for more than 57 years. You can listen to his fascinating story by clicking on his photo. (Just be sure to scroll to the bottom of the page it takes you to.)